Welcome to Will's Photoimaging's Blog

Prom photography and the cousin of the Wedding Uncle Bob

Uncle Bobs at are a recognised problem at some Weddings and they have a cousin increasingly appearing at other events like Proms. For clarification, an 'Uncle Bob' is someone who has not been booked by the organisers to provide photography coverage of the event. They turn up at the event sometimes as guests, sometimes at the request of a guest. They then take photographs that are not for their own personal record of the event but for the person who arranged for them to be there. This gives rise to numerous conflicts of interest and other issues.

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Copyright and photography

Digital photography and the internet has made copyright and photography more difficult to manage. Just because a photograph can be seen on the internet doesn't mean it is free to use. Using a photograph without permission is theft. I find it very worrying that not only do school pupils not realise / appreciate this but many staff also do not.

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Chimping and white balance - It is not as good as you might think

If you use chimping to set your exposure by looking at the histogram on the rear LCD and 'sort out white balance' afterwards rather than metering the light, you really need to be extra careful. One of the oft used phrases in these days if digital photography is 'If you're using raw then you can set white balance in post-processing'. ( Although many will incorrectly use the term 'editing' instead of post-processing. See footnote. ) How many times have you heard that statement or something similar. 'Use raw and you can fix it afterwards'. This is very much not the case if you are looking at optimising the technical quality of an image. If you over or under expose and then 'fix it afterwards' then you will be adding noise or artifacts and losing contrast. If you overexpose then highlight detail will be lost to blown white and, once it's gone, it's gone.

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Giving it 110% - thoughts on using percentages

In TV interviews you often hear of people giving '110 percent' or similar. Recently in a photography forum someone posted review details of a piece of equipment saying that it had '138% of the sRGB colourspace'. The device you are reading this on probably defaults to the sRGB colourspace, it is basically the range of colours and tones that can be represented within the colourspace. Unfortunately the person disagreed with my assertion that there was a numerical flaw in the review in just the same way as when someone says '110% effort'.

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